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workshops

 

Last week I participated in the ACM CSCW workshop on the “sharing economy”. It was a great group of folks with solid ideas and insights. The workshop organizers published all of the papers on the Sharing Economy: future of platforms as a site of work website. Here is a direct link to my paper: Dustin O’Hara, The Double Bind: Social Values and Design Choices

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One of the curious experiences of CSCW 2016 was encountering the telepresence robots as they moved about the conference. The photos above show one of the robots going into the main room of the conference, with a person holding the door open for them.

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For some years now, I’ve collaborated with my friends at The Center for Research in Engineering, Media and Performance (REMAP). The blog Gizmodo recently wrote a blog post cover a public demonstration of a new mobile interpretive media app we’ve been building for downtown LA.

Reposted from Gizmodo:

Los Angeles To Launch Nation's Largest Interactive Urban Trail Network

Los Angeles is a big place—0ver 400 square miles. Even though it’s home to the country’s largest urban park many of its residents do not have easy access to a public green space. A new “interactive interpretive” urban trail system hopes to close that distance, while connecting Angelenos to the hidden cultural and fitness opportunities in their city.

Gizmodo got a hands-on of the new app (which will be released officially in April) during a walk yesterday with its creators at the Interpretive Media Laboratory (IMLab). IMLab is a partnership between UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television and California State Parks that develops tech tools to help Angelenos access public space.

Joining us on the walk were Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell, who was in town to announce a new initiative that will connect local youth with urban wildlife refuges.

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Dustin O'Hara Facebook network visualization

Facebook Network Visualization using Gephi

This visualization was made in a PhD research methods seminar at UCLA, in the Information Studies Department, at the Charles E Young Research Library. The system that was used to run the network analysis and create the visualization is called Gephi. The research librarians at YRL are full of interesting tricks and tips, if you’re in the area I recommend a visit.

The different clusters illustrate different groups and organizations I’ve been a part of over the past ten+ years. The large mass in the center, is my undergraduate class at UCLA, the top right mass are cohort members from a masters program at UC Santa Cruz. The bottom-left pink cluster are high school friends that friended me some years after our graduation. The small blue cluster below the high school group was my first job out of college at RoadTrip Nation, and the red clusters to the right of that, are close friends and family, and friends from London. The names that are scaled up, are larger because they bridge the different clicks in my network. In total, the network is made of 700+ nodes or people.

 

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Shoreditch Park Project, Dustin O’Hara.

re-posted from the Shoreditch Park Project Website.

Standing in Shoreditch Park, it’s hard to comprehend the scale of destruction that set things in motion. Like many parks in east London, it’s a former WWII bomb site. A neighborhood of Victorian era houses flattened by the Blitz. Now, some seventy years later, it’s a well used and well equipped neighborhood park. Bordered, almost exclusively, by council owned social housing estates, the area has an established working class history. As part of this history, for nearly thirty years prior to becoming a park, the site was home to a neighbourhood of prefabricated homes.

Organized and funded by the British central government, the Temporary Housing Act of 1944, provided hundreds-of-thousands of people with their own prefabricated home. For many residents, their ‘prefab’ gave them their first day-to-day experience of living with indoor plumbing, modern appliances, and what middle class sensibilities would consider sufficient living space.

The Shoreditch Park Project emerged out of the basic impulse to orient oneself, to understand the social and material landscape of the neighbourhood, and the stories of how it has changed. In its current form, the park, offered a prime case study for exploring how social memory and local mythologies are reflected in the landscape. As a point of research, the Shoreditch Park Project has been thematically focused on this neighbourhood of prefab homes.

As factory built homes – the postwar prefabs, can be understood as an architectural-industrial expression of hope. The prefab program was a critical nexus point, of social policy, industrial urbanism, and design thinking that reshaped the domestic reality and daily lives of countless people. At the same time, the prefab housing program was part of a much wider campaign to rebuild the nation. From the National Health Service, to Universal Child Benefit, to state funded education, numerous programs, that act as instruments for social justice, emerged in the postwar years.

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Shoreditch Park Project, conducting an interview in the park. Listening to memories of living in the prefabricated homes in Shoreditch Park.

How does one situate this, established historic narrative of the Temporary Housing Act, in relation to the less fixed mythologies of life in this specific neighborhood? When interviewing people about how the neighborhood has changed, you quickly find contradictions and anecdotal details that reveal competing interests and embedded power relations that have historically shaped the neighborhood and continue to inform the stories we tell ourselves about the place. Often the voice itself, acts as powerful cultural register, determining our relational understanding of class, race, gender, and region. With regard to the prefabs, and housing in general, one will quickly comes to realize that housing is always an issue, and that the critical problems the prefab program addressed are still present, in one way or another.

Working with a group of youth researchers, we’ve held six months of weekly workshops, anchored in a curriculum that mixes new media literacy with heritage and social documentation research. We’ve reviewed the local council archives, hosted tea party gatherings, collected man-on-the-street style interviews, and gone on field trips to postwar prefabs that are still in use. In total we’ve conducted over 60 oral history interviews. The project has culminated in the production of an audio visual collection, website, park installation, and short sound piece. In this way, the project is a research/educationally driven interpretive project, that actively relocates the notion of cultural heritage from a noun to a verb, from a fixed object to an inherently collaborative and performative act.

– Dustin O’Hara, 20th June 2013

Visit the Shoreditch Park Project Website for more.

Dustin O'Hara A Brooks

A. Brooks
04 April – 18 May 2013
Private View: 04 April 2013 18.00 – 21.00

A Brooks Art is delighted to present A. Brooks a new project by Dustin O’Hara.

Before becoming a gallery, A. Brooks was a family run flower shop. For roughly 70 years the Brooks family sold flowers to their neighbours. Remembered by many local residents, the A. Brooks flower shop, and its family, became an integral part of the Hoxton landscape. The transition from a family run flower shop to a contemporary art gallery is emblematic of the wider changes currently unfolding across the neighbourhood. This exhibition mines the shop’s recent and personal history, as a way of reflecting upon both the personal lives that animated the flower shop and the wider collective identity of the Hoxton neighbourhood.

“The power of ordinary urban landscapes to nurture citizens’ public memory, to encompass shared time in the form of shared territory – remains untapped for most working people’s neighbourhoods” Dolores Hayden, The Power of Place

Dustin O'Hara A Brooks

The A. Brooks exhibition was developed in collaboration between Dustin O’Hara, Julia Riddiough, and Toni Brooks. Dustin O’Hara’s work could be described as experimental community archiving, Julia Riddiough currently runs the A. Brooks gallery and Toni Brooks is a retired florist. Kathy and Mark Brooks also worked in the shop and family business for over thirty years. Mark now has a stall in Hoxton Street market and continues to sell flowers today.